Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Netherlandish Painting in the Fifteenth Century: Broederlam to Bosch
AS.010.245 (01)

Explores the achievements and impact of the major painters working in the Burgundian Netherlands, especially the cities of Flanders, during the fifteenth century: Melchior Broederlam, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden; the Master of Flémalle, Hans Memling, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Merback, Mitchell
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, HART-MED

Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic World
AS.010.330 (01)

Despite its modern-day association with a fringe extremist movement, the term “caliphate” was traditionally used to describe the Muslim world at large, the political and spiritual ruler of which bore the title of caliph. The original Islamic caliphate was established in the seventh century as a vast empire centered on the Middle East and extending deep into Africa, Asia, and Europe. It soon broke apart into a series of competing powers, until in the tenth century, three rival dynasties—the Baghdad-based Abbasids, the Spanish Umayyads, and the Fatimids of North Africa—each claimed to be the rightful caliphate. This course will examine how these fascinating political developments and conflicts played out in the realm of art and architecture between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. As well as palaces, mosques, and commemorative buildings, the course will look at media ranging from ceramics and metalwork to textiles and illustrated manuscripts, with many of the artifacts being viewed firsthand in local museum collections. These works will be considered in relation to such themes as patronage, audience, ceremony, and meaning. Particular attention will be paid to how the various caliphates—both in emulation of and competition with one another—used visual culture as a powerful tool to assert their legitimacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED

Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century Germany
AS.010.336 (01)

Since the publication of Giorgio Vasari’s Lives (1550), in which the history of art was first conceived as the successive accomplishment of a select group of great men, the discipline of Art History has had a gender problem. Today, feminist scholars continue to grapple with this troubled legacy, working to redress the masculinist biases inherent in disciplinary methods and assumptions while at the same time fighting to recover the value of traditionally overlooked subjects and genres. In the early 1990s, the history of masculinity emerged as an adjunct to traditional feminist history. Aimed at addressing misconceptions about the nature and naturalness of male identity, this subfield has helped open masculinity to critical reevaluation. Drawing on the contributions of contemporary feminist scholarship as well as those of the history of masculinity, this course explores the ways in which a reconsideration of the nature of male identity in the historical past might help us rethink key art historical issues, for example, paradigmatic notions of the Renaissance artist, the nature of copying and competition, and the concepts of creativity, invention, and genius. The course will focus on developments in the German speaking world in the late fifteenth and sixteenth-centuries; as numerous historians have noted, the German speaking lands underwent a crisis of masculinity during this period, in part precipitated by the events of the Protestant Reformation. At the same time, the region witnessed profound changes in the status of the arts and of the artist. In this course, we will explore the ways in which these phenomena were related, and how they contributed to culturally specific notions of the relationship between masculinity and artistry. We will also consider the ways in which a close examination of masculinity in the German Renaissance opens up new avenues of art historical and cultural historical investigation with relevance beyond the period itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Stolurow, Benjamin Isaac
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/18
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Exhibiting Picasso: Modern Painting Now
AS.010.355 (01)

This course offers a critical introduction to modernist painting and its eurocentric art history by focusing on the work and reception of Pablo Picasso. At the center of the course is Picasso’s celebrated yet controversial painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon of 1907. Our point of departure is the recent rehang of the New York MoMA’s historical Cubism gallery. For decades, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon was positioned there as the prescient “masterwork,” surrounded by other cubist paintings. In 2019, however, the painting was thought-provokingly juxtaposed with Faith Ringgold’s work American People Series #20: Die of 1968, a figurative painting responding to civil rights struggles in the United States. What occasioned this curatorial intervention? Why does Picasso’s painting remain such a point of contention in exhibiting modern and contemporary art today? And what other curatorial and art historical strategies might be used to continue to decenter the canon? We will deepen our discussions with close-looking and collaborative visual analysis of paintings in the Phillips Collection and the National Gallery in Washington D.C. as well as local collections. We will also consult online collections and, in our course readings, consider formalist, social, feminist, and decolonial approaches to modern art. No prior familiarity with Picasso or modern art is necessary. Students from all fields are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Schopp, Caroline Lillian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Babylon: Myth and Reality
AS.010.364 (01)

Babylon – the name resonates even today, from the biblical whore of Revelation to sci-fi. It evokes exotic places and time long past. But what do we really know about the ancient city and the civilization that flourished there thousands of years ago? This course examines the archaeological city of Babylon, located in the modern state of Iraq, and considers its artistic and architectural achievements in the context of Mesopotamian history. The class will also survey the legacy of Babylon and its continuing relevance in contemporary society.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of our study. Collections study in local and regional museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 301
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Art and Politics in Modern China
AS.010.373 (01)

Art has always been intertwined with politics; one can even say art is always political. In modern China, this statement is especially poignant. The relationship between art and politics has been at the core of art production in China in the past century, and a perennial preoccupation of those in power, including now. This course will therefore examine three major threads: the documents, dictums, and decrees by the artists and by the regimes concerning the nature, function, and practice of art and artists in the 20th century, for example, Mao’s famous Yan’an talk in 1942; artists’ response to and art’s participation in the important political events and historical moments, for example, the 1989 democracy movement; we will also examine the space of resistance, intervention, and alterity that art created in modern China, concerning topics of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ecocriticism, privacy, and questions of historiography. The period we examine will begin at the end of the 19th century when artists struggled with a crumbling empire facing the onslaught of modernity, to the present.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Liu, Yinxing
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-CP, HART-MODERN

Ancient Americas Metallurgy
AS.010.407 (01)

This course addresses the technology, iconography and social significance of metals and draws on case studies from the Americas. Collections study in museums.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Hodson 203
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Visualizing Travel, Movement, and Interaction in the Ancient Americas
AS.010.458 (01)

In photographs and museum displays, the visual culture of the ancient Americas is made static. Pyramids stand vacant, sculptures appear frozen, and once portable objects remain stationary. But ancient American small-scale objects were designed to be set in motion for ritual and pilgrimage, free-standing stelae and altars were meant to be circumambulated and engaged with directly, and architecture (and spaces bound by architecture) influenced the shape of bodily movement. Notably absent from a twenty-first century vantage point are the ways that these spaces, and the spaces around art, were interacted with and how objects such as polychromed ceramics and carved pieces of precious stone were moved from place to place by the region’s ancient Indigenous residents. Exploring a rich visual and material record and considering the movement of both people and objects, this course asks how works of art influenced the ways ancient peoples physically interacted with and moved throughout the three-dimensional world. By considering a series of case studies from the ancient Americas, this course seeks to better understand the full aesthetic dimensions of this visual culture in the context of its rich social use. Additionally, we will also engage with issues related to contemporary travel, tourism, and migration that crosses through these places and materials. No prior knowledge of the field is required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Popovici, Catherine H
  • Room: Gilman 119
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman Empire
AS.010.465 (01)

Designed from the outset to be inhabited and used, works of architecture are inherently susceptible to changes in purpose, appearance, and meaning over time. This was particularly so in the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299–1922), a multiethnic and multireligious transcontinental polity whose territories were already marked by long and eventful architectural histories. Through such case studies as the Parthenon in Athens, the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople/Istanbul, the Citadel of Cairo, and the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem, this course investigates the ways in which buildings and sites have been appropriated, repurposed, transformed, and/or reconceptualized in response to changing sociopolitical and artistic conditions. Topics to be addressed include the conversion of places of worship, (re)decoration as a vehicle of ideology, and the phenomenon of spoliation—the recycling, whether for practical or symbolic reasons, of existing building materials. In addition to the monuments themselves, we will address the objects that filled them and the human activities they hosted. While our focus will be on the Ottoman context and its relationship to the past, the course will also consider comparable examples in other geographies as well as developments in the post-Ottoman era, including the current debate over the Parthenon marbles and the recent reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/8
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM

Picturing Performance
AS.010.474 (01)

Picturing Performance takes up the material traces of ancient Greek performance—the remains of theaters, paintings, masks, and musical instruments, as well as epigraphic, papyrological, and other textual transmissions of these works—alongside contemporary receptions of these performances, which have been such a rich site of reworking. Examples include: the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and Anäis Mitchell’s Hadestown, Euripides’ The Bacchae and Hope Mohr Dance’s Before Bacchae, and Sophocles’ Antigone and Theater of War’s Antigone in Ferguson. These ancient performances engage questions of gender and sexuality, constructions of race, migration, citizenship, and belonging, power, governance, and resistance, disease and collective healing, among the subjects that have also inspired contemporary interpretations. All texts will be read in translation. We will visit museum collections in the region and, where possible, see live performances of these works.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/6
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM, HART-MED

Figuration after Formlessness
AS.010.481 (01)

What would an art history of modernism look like that sought not to overcome or eliminate painterly figuration, but to attend to displaced and disparaged figures in it? At least since Benjamin Buchloh’s important 1981 warning about a “return to figuration” in European painting, figuration has been linked with questionable, if not highly suspect, aesthetic and political values – from nostalgia to repression. Buchloh inherits this this view from the historical avantgardes, which sought to counter conventions of figuration by developing disparate strategies of abstraction. And it is this view of figuration that guides both formalist and social art histories: For both share an anxiety about the authoritative figure of the human form. This seminar invites an alternative perspective on the artistic project of figuration. We look at modern and contemporary practices of figuration that cannot so easily be dismissed as retrogressive or authoritarian. These practices suggest ways of thinking the figure without an appeal to its coherent visibility or sovereign standing. We will read broadly in the contemporary critical theory, feminist and queer theory, Black thought, and critical disability studies that share this investment (e.g. Butler, Cavarero, Garland-Thomson, Halberstam, Hartman, Honig, Sharpe, Wynter). We will critically reconsider Rosalind Krauss and Yve-Alain Bois’ project Formless: A User’s Guide, along with the turn of the twenty-first century debates about abjection, feminism, and “body art” it engaged. Artists under discussion include Maria Lassnig, Ana Mendieta, Alina Szapocznikow, Kara Walker, and Hannah Wilke, amongst others. For the final research paper, graduate students are encouraged to bring their own archives to the questions addressed in the seminar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Schopp, Caroline Lillian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/5
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum
AS.040.137 (01)

This seminar investigates the Eastern Mediterranean as a space of intense cultural interaction in the Late Bronze Age, exploring how people, ideas, and things not only came into contact but deeply influenced one another through maritime trade, art, politics, etc. In addition to class discussion, we will work hands-on with artifacts from the JHU Archaeological Museum, focusing on material from Cyprus.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Anderson, Emily S.K.
  • Room: Gilman 150A
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: The Lives of Objects
AS.130.420 (01)

This writing intensive seminar introduces students to research methods in Near Eastern Studies through the "lives" of Ancient Near Eastern art works. The course focuses on "object biographies," exploring various case histories of ancient objects as they move through space and time, both in the past and today. Students will develop skills in specific research areas such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation that will lead to a final research paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/6
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

British Visual Culture and Medicine
AS.145.320 (01)

In this class, we will reflect on the ethical, gendered, and societal implications of the creation and exchange of British medical imagery. What purpose did this visual culture serve for artists, practitioners, and patients? How are we meant to look at these images today, outside of their original contexts? We will examine a range of images and objects from Britain, expanding our definition of “art” and interrogating the colonialist roots and origins of artistic and medical material. Our objects of study will extend from oil paintings of renowned physicians to diagnostic photographs of unnamed patients and from prints of gynecological dissection to satirical cartoons of “quack” doctors. We will look not only at how practitioners have had their patients depicted, but also at how those with illnesses or with disabilities have taken back their bodily power to portray themselves. Questions of portraiture, likeness, and consent will be constant themes throughout this course, guiding students’ development of ways of thinking critically and writing thoughtfully about medical images.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Slobogin, Christine
  • Room: Bloomberg 274
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/18
  • PosTag(s): MSCH-HUM

Made in Italy: Italian style in context
AS.211.224 (01)

Italy and the “Italian style” have become synonym of exquisite taste, class, and elegance thanks to the quality of Italian craftsmanship. This course will explore some of the major factors that contributed to the rise of Italian fashion and Italian industrial design as iconic all around the world. The classes will focus on the main protagonists and art movements that influenced the development of Italian style. We will analyze trends, clothing, and style not only in a historical context, but also through a critical apparatus that will include themes related to gender, culture, power, and politics. The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Italian is required, but those who can read in Italian will have an opportunity to do so. Everyone will learn some Italian words and expressions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Proietti, Leonardo
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 2/40
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL

The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. Lee
AS.211.315 (01)

As is clear from current events and debates surrounding monuments to the Confederacy, monuments play an outsize role in the public negotiation of history and identity and the creation of communal forms of memory. We will study the traditions of monuments and monumentality around the world – including statues and buildings along with alternative forms of monumentality – from antiquity to the present day. We will examine the ways that monuments have been favored methods for the powerful to signal identity and authorize history. This course will also explore the phenomenon of “counter-monumentality”, whereby monuments are transformed and infused with new meaning. These kinds of monuments can be mediums of expression and commemoration for minority and diaspora communities and other groups outside the economic and political systems that endow and erect traditional public monuments. The first half of the course will examine the theoretical framework of monumentality, with a focus on ancient monuments from the ancient Near East (e.g., Solomon’s temple). More contemporary examples will be explored in the second half of the course through lectures and also field trips. We will view contemporary debates around monuments in America in light of the long history of monuments and in comparison with global examples of monuments and counter-monuments. All readings in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Mandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel Jacob
  • Room: Gilman 479
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL

Curatorial Seminar: Touch and Tactility in 20th century American art
AS.389.420 (01)

As part of an ongoing collaboration with the Baltimore Museum of Art, students are invited to contribute to a special exhibition about touch and tactility in 20th century American art. Research artists such as Jasper Johns, Yoko Ono, Betye Saar, Felix Gonzalex-Torres, create thematic installations, and conceptualize museum interpretation to activate the tactile dimensions of art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Greenhouse 113
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC

Introduction to Art History II
AS.010.102 (03)

This course introduces world art and architecture from the late fourteenth century to the present, inclusive of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Islamic world. We will engage with thematic threads throughout, exploring landscape and the changing environment; portraiture, self-representation, and the body; calligraphy and writing-as-art and art in relation to writing; art and buildings meant to disappear or be re-made; imperialism, political resistance, and decolonization; and the circulation of artists, materials, and ideas around the globe. Works from the Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art will guide our discussion.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Rethinking Artistic Geography – The Renaissance in its Global Dimensions 1450-1650
AS.010.467 (01)

A seminar focusing on recent scholarship that seeks to conceptualize a “global Renaissance,” beginning with Italy and the Mediterranean and then addressing exchanges between Europe and Southern/Eastern Asia. Case studies of the mobility of artists and artifacts, artistic adaptation and translation, materials as commodities and bearers of meaning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Campbell, Stephen
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENEM

Literature and the Visual Arts
AS.213.332 (02)

Literature and the Visual Arts is devoted to exploring the resonances between literary and visual forms of artistic expression and their enrichment of the modernist cultural landscape. We will aim to understand how the interest in visual art by modernist writers, and the impressions of literature on modernist and contemporary artworks newly illuminate or challenge traditional aesthetics of the temporality and spatiality of the work, aesthetic judgment, and the phenomenology of aesthetic attention. Readings may include works of literature or aesthetics by Immanuel Kant, Rainer Maria Rilke, Paul Klee, Stefan Zweig, Martin Heidegger, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Siegfried Lenz, and Virginia Woolf, alongside work of many visual artists from van Gogh and Cézanne to German Expressionism and Anselm Kiefer. Taught in English.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Literature and the Visual Arts
AS.213.332 (01)

Literature and the Visual Arts is devoted to exploring the resonances between literary and visual forms of artistic expression and their enrichment of the modernist cultural landscape. We will aim to understand how the interest in visual art by modernist writers, and the impressions of literature on modernist and contemporary artworks newly illuminate or challenge traditional aesthetics of the temporality and spatiality of the work, aesthetic judgment, and the phenomenology of aesthetic attention. Readings may include works of literature or aesthetics by Immanuel Kant, Rainer Maria Rilke, Paul Klee, Stefan Zweig, Martin Heidegger, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Siegfried Lenz, and Virginia Woolf, alongside work of many visual artists from van Gogh and Cézanne to German Expressionism and Anselm Kiefer. Taught in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Introduction to Art History II
AS.010.102 (01)

This course introduces world art and architecture from the late fourteenth century to the present, inclusive of Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the Islamic world. We will engage with thematic threads throughout, exploring landscape and the changing environment; portraiture, self-representation, and the body; calligraphy and writing-as-art and art in relation to writing; art and buildings meant to disappear or be re-made; imperialism, political resistance, and decolonization; and the circulation of artists, materials, and ideas around the globe. Works from the Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art will guide our discussion.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 55
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art History
AS.010.413 (01)

This course introduces students to the principal methods and theories of art history. Students will work through readings foundational for the discipline, texts that define key methodological consolidations in the twentieth century, and more recent (e.g. feminist, visual studies, global, post-colonial, and/or ecological) critiques and rethinking. Specific texts will vary by instructor, but the course seeks—in any instantiation—to include a plurality of perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Gilman 177
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/17
  • PosTag(s): HART-THRY

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.245 (01)Netherlandish Painting in the Fifteenth Century: Broederlam to BoschTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177HART-RENBAR, HART-MED
AS.010.330 (01)Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic WorldTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMRustem, UnverGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-MED
AS.010.336 (01)Männer und Meister: Artistry and Masculinity in Sixteenth-Century GermanyTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMStolurow, Benjamin IsaacGilman 177INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.010.355 (01)Exhibiting Picasso: Modern Painting NowTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSchopp, Caroline LillianGilman 177HART-MODERN
AS.010.364 (01)Babylon: Myth and RealityTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMFeldman, MarianGilman 177HART-ANC
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 301HART-ANC
AS.010.373 (01)Art and Politics in Modern ChinaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLiu, YinxingGilman 177INST-CP, HART-MODERN
AS.010.407 (01)Ancient Americas MetallurgyW 1:30PM - 4:00PMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 203HART-ANC
AS.010.458 (01)Visualizing Travel, Movement, and Interaction in the Ancient AmericasM 4:30PM - 7:00PMPopovici, Catherine HGilman 119HART-ANC
AS.010.465 (01)Renew, Reuse, Recycle: Afterlives of Architecture in the Ottoman EmpireTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverLatrobe 120INST-GLOBAL, HART-RENEM
AS.010.474 (01)Picturing PerformanceF 1:30PM - 4:00PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 177MSCH-HUM, HART-MED
AS.010.481 (01)Figuration after FormlessnessW 4:30PM - 7:00PMSchopp, Caroline LillianGilman 177HART-MODERN
AS.040.137 (01)Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological MuseumM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 150A
AS.130.420 (01)Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: The Lives of ObjectsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, MarianGilman 177MSCH-HUM
AS.145.320 (01)British Visual Culture and MedicineW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSlobogin, ChristineBloomberg 274MSCH-HUM
AS.211.224 (01)Made in Italy: Italian style in contextMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMProietti, LeonardoKrieger 180INST-GLOBAL, MLL-ENGL, MLL-ITAL
AS.211.315 (01)The Meanings of Monuments: From the Tower of Babel to Robert E. LeeTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMMandell, Alice H; Spinner, Samuel JacobGilman 479MLL-ENGL, INST-GLOBAL
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial Seminar: Touch and Tactility in 20th century American artTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMKingsley, Jennifer PGreenhouse 113PMUS-PRAC
AS.010.102 (03)Introduction to Art History IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 55
AS.010.467 (01)Rethinking Artistic Geography – The Renaissance in its Global Dimensions 1450-1650M 4:30PM - 7:00PMCampbell, StephenGilman 177HART-RENEM
AS.213.332 (02)Literature and the Visual ArtsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaLatrobe 120MLL-ENGL
AS.213.332 (01)Literature and the Visual ArtsW 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaLatrobe 120MLL-ENGL
AS.010.102 (01)Introduction to Art History IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 55
AS.010.413 (01)Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art HistoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStager, Jennifer M SGilman 177HART-THRY