Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Art History I
AS.010.101 (01)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Art History I
AS.010.101 (02)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Art History I
AS.010.101 (03)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 177
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Art History I
AS.010.101 (04)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Feldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, Nino
  • Room: Virtual Online Gilman 119
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/14
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Mirror Mirror: Reflections in Art from Van Eyck to Velázquez
AS.010.212 (01)

Explores the different ways Early Modern painters and printmakers incorporated mirrors and optical reflections into their works for the sake of illusion and metaphor, deception and desire, reflexivity and truth-telling. Connecting sense perception and ethical knowledge, embedded mirror images often made claims about the nature of the self, the powers of art, and the superiority of painting in particular.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Merback, Mitchell (Mitchell)
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/16
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR, HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL

Contemporary Art of the Americas
AS.010.230 (01)

This course surveys contemporary art from a hemispheric perspective, one that includes South, Central, and North America. We explore contemporary artistic production beginning around 1960 across media from painting and sculpture to street performance and interventions. This includes movements such as Minimalism, Tropicália, Pop Art, and Escena de Avanzada. With careful attention to European and indigenous influences, we examine how contemporary art of the Americas has served the formation of national identity, resistance to government oppression, and engagement with global politics. Through an understanding of the political, social, and aesthetic contexts, students will gain the skills and confidence to discuss contemporary art as a historically grounded articulation of present cultural needs.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Flores-Garcia, Jez
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Sculpture and Ideology in the Middle Ages
AS.010.252 (01)

This lecture course will offer a selective, thematic exploration of the art of sculpture as practiced in the Middle Ages, from the fall of the Roman empire in the 4th century CE to height of the Gothic era. The primary concern will be to analyze sculpture in all of its forms – monumental free-standing, architectural, liturgical, and commemorative – as the primary medium utilized by patrons, both private and corporate, to display political messages to an ever growing public.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Lakey, Christopher (Chris)
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Art of Colonial Peru
AS.010.320 (01)

Viewed within the dynamic historical context of colonial society, we consider the pictorial, sculptural, and architectural programs that ensued in viceregal Peru (1532-1825). We examine the role of religious orders, art schools, artisan guilds and cofradía, and consider the social and political implications of art patronage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern Art and Mass Culture
AS.010.326 (01)

What happens to art after the widespread production and circulation of readymade commodities in the twentieth century? How does it contend with the technological developments—print media, photography, film—accompanying industrial production and urbanization? Focusing on procedural innovations central to the history of modern art—collage, nominalism, montage, conceptualism, and performance—and debates in art history about art’s “public,” we will ask how artists responded to, critiqued, and incorporated features of the industrial world in their practice. In particular, we will be interested in asking what kind of shared culture art attempted to forge against the homogenizing forces of industrial capitalism. Central to our inquiry is the repeated concern artists, critics, and theorists raise about the distinction between art and life, and about the importance to both of critical historical thinking. While introducing students to the history of modern art, this course also focuses on special contemporary projects by artists of color, theorized together using digital materials. Texts include Marx, Adorno, Benjamin, Federici, and Mulvey.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Ballakrishnen, Meghaa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

From Mystique to Critique: Feminism and the Visual Arts 1970 to present
AS.010.328 (01)

This course examines the relationship between feminism and the visual arts from the 1970s until the present day. Through close analysis of individual works of art and detailed attention to particular historical contexts, we will uncover how specific media, processes, and subject matter articulate an array of feminist attitudes towards issues such as gender, subjectivity, race, class, sexuality, motherhood, labor, abortion, and religion. Relevant theoretical texts will be juxtaposed to specific case studies in order to further illuminate the works’ feminist stakes.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Antonucci, Marica Francesca
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600
AS.010.329 (01)

Centered on modern-day Turkey and encompassing vast territories in Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Ottoman Empire (1299 – 1923) was the longest lived and among the most powerful Islamic states in history, with an artistic tradition to match. This course explores the functional and symbolic role that architecture played during the empire’s formative centuries, when three successive capital — Bursa, Edirne, and Istanbul — served to visualize the sultans’ growing claims to universal authority. With reference to mosques, palaces, tombs, and other categories of architecture, the course will examine the buildings in their artistic, social, and political contexts. Themes to be addressed include patronage and audience, architectural practice and the building trade, ceremonial and ritual, topography and urban planning, and the relationship of Ottoman architecture to other traditions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic Empires
AS.010.338 (01)

Long characterized in the Western imagination as exotic realms of fantasy, harems in Islamic tradition served as private domestic quarters for the women of elite households. This course explores the harem—as an institution, a physical space, and a community of women—from various art-historical perspectives, considering such topics as the harem’s architecture, the agency of its inhabitants as patrons and collectors, the mediating role of eunuchs in the harem’s visual and material culture, and the ability of harem women to make their mark through public artistic commissions. Our case studies will address a range of Islamic geographical and chronological contexts, though we will focus on the empires of the early modern period and, above all, the famous harem of the Ottoman sultans at the Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. In challenging popular misconceptions, the course will also look at the wealth of exoticizing imagery that the harem inspired in Western art, which we will consider through Orientalist paintings at the Walters Art Museum and illustrated rare books at Hopkins itself.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Rustem, Unver
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South Asia
AS.010.352 (01)

This course will explore modern and contemporary art in colonial and postcolonial contexts from Bangladesh to northern Africa. How do artists negotiate demands to support their national and local identities while participating in modernism across borders? What role do secularism and spirituality have in modern art? How do anticolonial, Marxist, and feminist politics shape art in these regions? How do global economic forces and the rise of powerful collectors, private museums, and international art fairs shape art and artists working across this geographic area? We will foreground the role of women as artists, collectors, patrons, and scholars throughout.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Art of the Ancient Andes
AS.010.365 (01)

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Deleonardis, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/25
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC

Art and Science in the Middle Ages
AS.010.403 (01)

This course investigates the intersections of art and science from the Carolingian period through the fourteenth century and the historical role images played in the pursuit of epistemic truths. Science – from the Latin scientia, or knowledge – in the Middle Ages included a broad range of intellectual pursuits into both the supernatural and natural worlds, and scholars have classified these pursuits in various ways (i.e. experimental or theoretical science, practical science, magic, and natural philosophy). A particular focus of this seminar will be placed on the assimilation of Greek and Islamic scientific advances in cartography, cosmology, and optical theory into the Latin theological tradition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lakey, Christopher (Chris)
  • Room: MSE Library ERC  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Epistemology of Photography
AS.010.410 (01)

This seminar will ask how photography produces ways of knowing: how does photography’s reality-effect shape its dissemination and absorption? Is photography’s emergence during the colonial era coincidental or catalytic? How is memory (re)constituted in a photography-saturated world? What kinds of histories does photography encourage and discourage? Is a photograph an object? We will read across disciplines (literature, anthropology, history, history of art, political science, theory) to investigate the epistemology of photography and the photograph.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Brown, Rebecca Mary
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art History
AS.010.413 (01)

This course introduces students to the principal methods and theories of art history. Students will work through readings foundational for the discipline, texts that define key methodological consolidations in the twentieth century, and more recent (e.g. feminist, visual studies, global, post-colonial, and/or ecological) critiques and rethinking. Specific texts will vary by instructor, but the course seeks—in any instantiation—to include a plurality of perspectives.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Stager, Jennifer M S
  • Room: Bloomberg 172  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Death and the State: Archaeologies of Governance in the Americas
AS.010.452 (01)

This seminar explores the relationship between death and governance, with a focus on the archaeology and art history of the Americas. Our readings will examine key social and anthropological theories of death, questioning whether and how they might apply to the archaeological record through in-class archaeological case studies. Themes include interactions with ancestors and spirits, records of political struggles and war, questions about race and ethnicity, incidents of mass killings, debates on power and sovereignty, crime and punishment, and the archaeology of institutional care, science and medicine.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Rossi, Franco (Franco)
  • Room: Gilman 300  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM

The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900
AS.010.461 (01)

"Doubling" is a grammar of resemblance and difference: in works of doubling a presentation of two shapes, images or bodies, often in a symmetrical format, forces us to compare them--to perceive how they are alike and unalike. The art of doubling causes us to “see double” and to see ourselves in the act of seeing; it forces us to perceive the differences between things and bodies, catalyzing a reflection on identity. Doubling is a recurring theme of modern and contemporary art, apparent in painting, sculpture, photography, video, film, and performance. While few artists are strictly “doublers,” many practitioners have embraced tactics of repetition and reversal, staged perceptual contradictions, or explored doubled and divided selves (Doppelgängers, shadows, twins, and pairs); the course will aim to understand why. The class is organized in anticipation of an exhibition opening at the National Gallery of Art in May 2022.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Meyer, James
  • Room: Gilman 177  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/8
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL

Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer Solidarities
AS.100.340 (01)

This interdisciplinary course surveys critical themes related to Asian American art and activism including perspectives from history, art and visual culture, literature and gender and sexuality studies.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Shirazi, Sadia
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL

Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient Mesopotamia
AS.130.129 (01)

Ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Iran, is the “cradle of civilization.” It witnessed new inventions previously unknown to the ancient world: urban cities, writing systems, kingship, and empires. This course examines the close relationship between war and peace and art in ancient Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria) from 3500 to 539 BCE. During the semester students will be introduced to the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Mesopotamia. This course is aimed at students without a previous background in art historical or archaeological approaches to Mesopotamia, but more advanced students are welcome.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Taylor, Avary Rhys
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to Present
AS.130.222 (01)

For over 5,200 years humans have used writing as a record for political, administrative, social, religious, and scholarly pursuits. Over millennia diverse scripts have been written, inscribed, carved, impressed, and painted on a variety of objects such as papyrus, stone, ivory, clay, leather, wax, rope, paper, metal, bone, wood, and other mediums. Today, the practice of writing has primarily shifted to the digital world. Computers are often the preferred way for people to “write.” In this course students will be invited to critically examine relationships between scribes, craftsmen, writing, and materials. The goal of the course is for students to recognize how writing has shaped religious and political movements, and aided bureaucratic endeavors from the invention of writing around 3200 B.C. to the present day. In the first part of the semester we will explore the emergence of writing in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China, and Mesoamerica. In the second half of the course students will explore how the act of writing transitioned from hand written manuscripts, to printed books, and now digitized texts. We will explore the way that computers and social media have changed the way that people interact with writing. The seminar will include lecture, discussion, museum fieldtrips, and experimental archaeology labs to investigate and engage with the materiality of clay cuneiform tablets, Egyptian papyrus, Roman wax writing boards, and more!

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Shippelhoute, Karlene Dee Ann
  • Room: Gilman 119  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Creating an Egyptian Temple
AS.130.377 (01)

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bryan, Betsy Morrell
  • Room: Gilman 130G  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Crosslisted with Archaeology, History, History of Art, International Studies and Medicine, Science & Humanities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P
  • Room: Hodson 303  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL

Curatorial Seminar: Ancient Art
AS.389.420 (01)

Course focuses on the theory, ethics, issues, and practice of curatorial work. This semester we will curate a new, more global, installation of ancient art at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Applied work will include finalizing the list of artworks to include, working with lead curator Kevin Tervala on the installation plan and design; developing new interpretations for the Antioch mosaics and for artworks drawn from collections that span Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas; and writing and workshopping labels.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin Dixon
  • Room: Hodson 301  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.101 (01)Introduction to Art History IMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMFeldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, NinoVirtual Online
Gilman 177
AS.010.101 (02)Introduction to Art History IMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMFeldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, NinoVirtual Online
Gilman 177
AS.010.101 (03)Introduction to Art History IMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMFeldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, NinoVirtual Online
Gilman 177
AS.010.101 (04)Introduction to Art History IMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMFeldman, Marian, Zchomelidse, NinoVirtual Online
Gilman 119
AS.010.212 (01)Mirror Mirror: Reflections in Art from Van Eyck to VelázquezTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, Mitchell (Mitchell)Gilman 177
 
HART-RENBAR, HART-RENEM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.230 (01)Contemporary Art of the AmericasTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMFlores-Garcia, Jez 
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.252 (01)Sculpture and Ideology in the Middle AgesMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMLakey, Christopher (Chris)Gilman 177
 
AS.010.320 (01)Art of Colonial PeruTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaBloomberg 172
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.326 (01)Modern Art and Mass CultureMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMBallakrishnen, MeghaaGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN
AS.010.328 (01)From Mystique to Critique: Feminism and the Visual Arts 1970 to presentTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMAntonucci, Marica FrancescaGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN
AS.010.329 (01)Building an Empire: Architecture of the Ottoman Capitals, c. 1300–1600TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.338 (01)Art and the Harem: Women’s Spaces, Patronage, and (Self-)Representation in Islamic EmpiresW 1:30PM - 4:00PMRustem, UnverGilman 177
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.352 (01)Modern and Contemporary Art: Middle East and South AsiaMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.365 (01)Art of the Ancient AndesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH, HART-ANC
AS.010.403 (01)Art and Science in the Middle AgesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLakey, Christopher (Chris)MSE Library ERC
 
AS.010.410 (01)The Epistemology of PhotographyM 4:30PM - 7:00PMBrown, Rebecca MaryGilman 119
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.010.413 (01)Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art HistoryM 1:30PM - 4:00PMStager, Jennifer M SBloomberg 172
 
AS.010.452 (01)Death and the State: Archaeologies of Governance in the AmericasW 4:30PM - 7:00PMRossi, Franco (Franco)Gilman 300
 
HART-ANC, HART-NW, ARCH-ARCH, MSCH-HUM
AS.010.461 (01)The Double: Identity and Difference in Art Since 1900Th 4:30PM - 7:00PMMeyer, JamesGilman 177
 
HART-MODERN, INST-GLOBAL
AS.100.340 (01)Asian American Art and Activism: Third World, Feminist, and Queer SolidaritiesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMShirazi, Sadia 
 
HIST-ASIA, HIST-MIDEST, HIST-US, INST-GLOBAL
AS.130.129 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Art of War and Peace in Ancient MesopotamiaMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMTaylor, Avary RhysGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.222 (01)From Papyrus to Pixels: The Materiality of Writing from Past to PresentMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMShippelhoute, Karlene Dee AnnGilman 119
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.130.377 (01)Creating an Egyptian TempleMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMBryan, Betsy MorrellGilman 130G
 
ARCH-ARCH
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMKingsley, Jennifer PHodson 303
 
HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH, PMUS-INTRO, MSCH-HUM, INST-GLOBAL
AS.389.420 (01)Curatorial Seminar: Ancient ArtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMKingsley, Jennifer P, Tervala, Kevin DixonHodson 301
 
PMUS-PRAC, ARCH-RELATE