Undergraduate Courses

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/.

Please consult the online course catalog for cross-listed courses and full course information.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to the History of Western Art II
AS.010.102 (01)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Renaissance Body Exposed: Exhibiting the Nude in European Art 1400-1550
AS.010.331 (01)

Explores the extraordinary currency of the naked human figure in pre-modern European visual culture, only inadequately accounted for by explanations such as the "rise of naturalism" or the "revival of antiquity." Will also explore curatorial questions arising from an exhibition currently in preparation on the Renaissance nude. Assignment in the form of catalog texts and a "virtual exhibition."

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Introduction to the History of Western Art II
AS.010.102 (02)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to the History of Western Art II
AS.010.102 (04)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Space and Experience in Rome’s Provinces during the 2nd century CE
AS.010.317 (01)

During the early 2nd century CE, the Roman Empire expanded its borders to its greatest extent, spanning from Spain to the Near East and northern Europe to North Africa, ushering in a period of unprecedented imperial and elite patronage in the provinces. The period is crucial for understanding the role of space in Roman art as it saw the rise of artistic interest in distortions of scale and space. This seminar-style course considers Rome's provincial art and architecture of the 2nd century CE through the conceptual lens of space. It considers the physical spaces of Roman provincial art, examining geographically diverse evidence, but also uses various conceptions of space to approach the evidence and explore the idiosyncrasies of each province’s material culture.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

The Augustan Age: Art and Architecture in the Capital of the Empire
AS.010.318 (01)

This course investigates Roman art and architecture during the Augustan age (31 BC – AD 14). Augustus’ cultural program influenced many aspects of Roman life, leading to the creation of a new visual language that transformed Roman society. Methodologically, the focus will be on the integration of diverse sources to reconstruct and discuss the images and the built environment of the Augustan age.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic World
AS.010.330 (01)

Despite its modern-day association with a fringe extremist movement, the term “caliphate” was traditionally used to describe the Muslim world at large, the political and spiritual ruler of which bore the title of caliph. The original Islamic caliphate was established in the seventh century as a vast empire centered on the Middle East and extending deep into Africa, Asia, and Europe. It soon broke apart into a series of competing powers, until in the tenth century, three rival dynasties—the Baghdad-based Abbasids, the Spanish Umayyads, and the Fatimids of North Africa—each claimed to be the rightful caliphate. This course will examine how these fascinating political developments and conflicts played out in the realm of art and architecture between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. As well as palaces, mosques, and commemorative buildings, the course will look at media ranging from ceramics and metalwork to textiles and illustrated manuscripts, with many of the artifacts being viewed firsthand in local museum collections. These works will be considered in relation to such themes as patronage, audience, ceremony, and meaning. Particular attention will be paid to how the various caliphates—both in emulation of and competition with one another—used visual culture as a powerful tool to assert their legitimacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST

Renegade Storytellers: The Narrative Possibilities of Contemporary Art
AS.010.335 (01)

Although visual storytelling has been a goal of artists and craftspeople throughout history, the dominant voices in early and mid-20th-century art and criticism expressed a preference for non-representational imagery and the investigation of purely formal properties. Today’s artists have once again embraced narrative possibilities and are able to deploy an exciting and expanded range of media and technology. Through their often unruly and at times transgressive stories, contemporary artists seek to represent personal identity, critique institutions and society, assert humanistic values, and entertain. Led by The Baltimore Museum of Art’s Senior Curator of Contemporary Art Kristen Hileman, students will engage in the visual and conceptual analysis of specific artworks to decipher narrative qualities. Among the many artists to be discussed, those that are part of the BMA’s contemporary collection and exhibitions program will be given particular attention. These include Sophie Calle, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Mary Reid Kelley and Patrick Kelley, Meleko Mokgosi, Ryan Trecartin and Lizzie Fitch, and John Waters. This course aims to enhance knowledge of art history, recent developments in art, and visual literacy.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Introduction to the History of Western Art II
AS.010.102 (03)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Renaissance Art in the Netherlands: Broederlam to Bosch
AS.010.340 (01)

Explores the major painters working in the Low Countries during the fifteenth century: Melchior Broederlam, the Master of Flémalle, Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden; Hans Memling, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Medieval Art in Europe: Methodology, Historiography, Theory
AS.010.360 (01)

The course explores the conceptual character of medieval European art from Late Antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages with an emphasis on methodological, historiographical, and theoretical issues. Using selected monuments and objects from a wide geographical range and dating from the 4th to the 14th centuries as case studies, students will also familiarize with the methodological developments of art historical research. The course will focus in particular on the "anthropological turn" of medieval art history and medieval image theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/18
  • PosTag(s): HART-MED

The Stone and the Thread
AS.010.389 (01)

Inka architecture in its social, historical and cultural contexts forms the basis of this course. Shared forms and ideas implicit in the fiber arts offer comparative points for analysis and discussion.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art History
AS.010.413 (01)

Critical readings in and of relevance to the intellectual foundations of the modern discipline of art history. Texts by Wölfflin, Riegl, Warburg, Panofsky, Baxandall, Alpers, Clark, Fried, and others. There will be two papers, no exams.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-THRY

The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum
AS.040.366 (01)

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Course topics will include the island's unique position between the Aegean and Near East and how this has impacted both Cyprus' ancient past and the way in which it has been conceived in the modern world. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Ancient Color: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in Antiquity
AS.389.315 (01)

What role did the colorful surfaces of sculptures, vessels and textiles play in the ancient world? We examine historical texts and recent scholarly and scientific publications on the technologies and meanings of color in antiquity, and use imaging and analytical techniques to study polychromed objects from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Collecting the Contemporary
AS.389.358 (01)

What does it mean to be a collector? Students will visit private collections of contemporary art in Baltimore, learning from collectors and their objects. This course alternates seminar meetings, focused on theories and practices of collecting, with field trips. Cross-listed with History of Art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Icon in East and West
AS.010.418 (01)

The chronologically structured seminar discusses the conception and reception of holy images in the Middle Ages from Late Antiquity until the beginning of the Renaissance. We will investigate their creation during the rise of Christianity and their affinities with Graeco-Roman portraits and cult images. Another focus is dedicated to the theological and political context of icons during the waves of early medieval iconoclasm, in particular in Byzantium. We will address icons made in the Holy Land during the crusades, which are often characterized by merging Frankish and Byzantine styles and motifs with Islamic art. We will discuss the emergence of new icons in Italy, and their pan-European distribution after 1100. Here we will focus on the influence of the papal court and the economic impact of icons in the later Middle Ages in the Italian commune.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-MED, GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Power and Politics in Assyrian Art
AS.010.470 (01)

Assyria, centered in northern Iraq, created one of the world’s first great empires that dominated the ancient Near Eastern world from around 900 to 612 BCE. In concert with imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This seminar examines the close relationship between the arts and politics in the Assyrian empire. Some themes that will be explored are: historical narrative, text and image, portable luxury arts and gender, politics and religion. The course will engage in close visual analysis of the ancient materials and readings of critical scholarship.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

The Power of Roman Art: the Capitoline Hill in Antiquity
AS.010.417 (01)

This course examines private and public spaces on the Capitoline hill, from Romulus’ foundation of the temple of Jupiter Feretrius to the destruction of the temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus in late antiquity. The focus is on Greek and Roman art, architecture, archaeology, and literary sources.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.102 (01)Introduction to the History of Western Art IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMWarnock, MollyHodson 203
AS.010.331 (01)The Renaissance Body Exposed: Exhibiting the Nude in European Art 1400-1550MW 12:00PM - 1:15PMCampbell, StephenGilman 177HART-RENBAR
AS.010.102 (02)Introduction to the History of Western Art IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMWarnock, MollyHodson 203
AS.010.102 (04)Introduction to the History of Western Art IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWarnock, MollyHodson 203
AS.010.317 (01)Space and Experience in Rome’s Provinces during the 2nd century CEMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMMiranda, Amy ChristineGilman 119HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.318 (01)The Augustan Age: Art and Architecture in the Capital of the EmpireTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMTucci, Pier LuigiGilman 177HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.330 (01)Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic WorldTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMRustem, UnverGilman 177HART-NW, ISLM-ISLMST
AS.010.335 (01)Renegade Storytellers: The Narrative Possibilities of Contemporary ArtM 6:00PM - 8:30PMHileman, KristenGilman 177HART-MODERN
AS.010.102 (03)Introduction to the History of Western Art IIMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMWarnock, MollyHodson 203
AS.010.340 (01)Renaissance Art in the Netherlands: Broederlam to BoschTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177HART-RENBAR
AS.010.360 (01)Medieval Art in Europe: Methodology, Historiography, TheoryMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMZchomelidse, NinoGilman 119HART-MED
AS.010.389 (01)The Stone and the ThreadTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, LisaHodson 216HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.413 (01)Historical and Conceptual Bases of Art HistoryT 3:00PM - 5:30PMCampbell, StephenGilman 177HART-THRY
AS.040.366 (01)The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU MuseumT 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 150AARCH-ARCH
AS.389.315 (01)Ancient Color: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in AntiquityF 1:30PM - 3:50PMBalachandran, SanchitaGilman 150AARCH-ARCH
AS.389.358 (01)Collecting the ContemporaryT 1:30PM - 3:50PMAnderson, VirginiaGilman 77
AS.010.418 (01)The Icon in East and WestM 2:00PM - 4:30PMZchomelidse, NinoGilman 119HART-MED, GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.010.470 (01)Power and Politics in Assyrian ArtF 1:30PM - 4:00PMFeldman, MarianGilman 177HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.417 (01)The Power of Roman Art: the Capitoline Hill in AntiquityTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMTucci, Pier LuigiGilman 119HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Art of the Ancient Americas
AS.010.105 (01)

This course provides a basis for the study of ancient Americas art and architecture and a broad exposure to the issues relevant to its study. Select visual arts within the primary regions of Mexico and Central America will be emphasized. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and the JHU Archaeological Museum (JHAM), students will participate in on-site study of the collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH

Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to Empire
AS.010.222 (01)

Rome created one of the world’s most powerful empires that dominated the Mediterranean from the 3rd century BCE into the 4th century CE. As Rome expanded its borders, its cities saw a proliferation of sculptural monuments that produced a visual political rhetoric and expressed imperial ideologies. This class examines the close relationship between Roman sculpture and politics from the Republic through the Severan principate. Through close visual analysis of the ancient materials and critical readings of scholarship, this course will examine the role of sculpture in the formation, reproduction, and attenuation of imperial rule.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): HART-ANC

Intro to History West Art
AS.010.101 (01)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The ‘Long Sixties’ in Europe
AS.010.310 (01)

This seminar examines aspects of advanced artistic production that emerged in France, Italy, the Benelux, and German-speaking countries primarily in the years 1945-1972 as constituent elements of the “Long Sixties,” a period of extraordinary and often rapid social transformation. Among our questions: How was the work of art reimagined and repositioned in the wake of World War II and the horrors of the Holocaust, in the context of reconstruction and an emerging consumer society, and in light of the Cold War, decolonization, and other political tensions and cataclysms? How did artists conceive the claims of artistic tradition in a rapidly expanding field of aesthetic practices and possibilities? What were the relations among advanced artistic practices and the “cultural revolutions” generally taken to have come to a head ca. 1968? Integral to this course is a student-curated exhibition of avant-garde materials at the MSE Library, to open in November 2018.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Intro to History West Art
AS.010.101 (04)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Abstraction
AS.010.203 (01)

This course will examine the elaboration and dissemination of major iterations of “abstract” art at key junctures throughout the twentieth century, with an emphasis primarily on developments in Europe and the Americas. Why abstraction? What were the formal, social, and philosophical stakes of divergent models and paradigms of abstract practice? And what difference do they make in the history and theory of artistic modernism? Class visits to the BMA and Special Collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

Art, Architecture and Urban Life in Renaissance Italy
AS.010.207 (01)

In recent years architectural and urban historians have begun to approach the built environment of the city not as a stage upon which an urban drama played out, but as the very medium that gave that drama form and shaped its meaning. This course aims to introduce students to the multifaceted features of the Italian Renaissance city by investigating the social and cultural history of urbanization as expressed in sculpture, painting, and architecture. We will explore a range of cities in central and northern Italy, including the major centers of Rome, Florence, Siena and Venice. A number of public works, monuments, and buildings will be discussed in a wide context informed by urban design and ritual life. Emphasis will be placed upon examining the role of works of art operating in conjunction with architecture in the shaping of public spaces and the creation of civic identities. The conditions of artistic production and the materials and techniques of painting, sculpture and architecture will also be discussed. A variety of texts will be read in conjunction with classroom analysis of visual materials in order to explore how urban spaces were lived and experienced. The course will be approached as a working seminar in which students will be expected to participate in discussions of the weekly readings, as well as conduct their own research culminating in the production of research papers.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Art of Colonial Peru
AS.010.320 (01)

Viewed within the dynamic historical context of colonial society, we consider the pictorial, sculptural, and architectural programs that ensued in viceregal Peru (1532-1825). We examine the role of religious orders, art schools, artisan guilds and cofradía, and consider the social and political implications of art patronage.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): HART-NW

Intro to History West Art
AS.010.101 (02)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Intro to History West Art
AS.010.101 (03)

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and medieval culture.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Passion Image, Passion Cult, Passion Drama: Narrative and Metaphor in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Beyond
AS.010.419 (01)

A set of interdisciplinary explorations of the Passion of Christ narrative in Scripture, theology, visionary literature, cultic devotion, the visual and dramatic arts in Europe from the Central Middle Ages to the Reformation, with a special fast-forward to modern cinematic retellings of the Passion story.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/6
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Arts of the Spanish Empire
AS.010.325 (01)

From the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, visual forms and practices linked such disparate places as Mexico City and Naples, Manila and Lima, Cuzco and Antwerp, Quito and Madrid: all cities in the Spanish Empire. This course provides an overview of the visual strategies deployed by the Spanish Crown and the Catholic Church across these vast global geographies to consolidate political power and instill religious faith. Such regimes of visuality were reshaped by local conditions and concerns. Focusing on different cities in the Spanish Empire, this course will examine the entanglements between the global and universal ideals of empire and their local manifestations and contestations. Students will gain a broad understanding of the diversity of artistic production in the Spanish empire, exploring religious paintings and sculptures; maps used for imperial surveillance; luxury goods crafted from shimmering feathers, ceramics, ivory, and precious metals; urban design and architecture from the ports of Europe to the highland outposts of the Andes; ephemeral cityscapes for civic performance. Through an examination of such topics, this course offers an introduction to the art historical methods and theoretical concerns used to study objects within an imperial frame.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/20
  • PosTag(s): HART-RENBAR

Celebration and Performance in Early Greece
AS.040.218 (01)

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-ARCH

Patronage and Power: The Art of the Book in the Middle Ages
AS.010.425 (01)

This research seminar surveys the rich history of manuscript painting in the Middle Ages through the lens of patronage. By focusing on elite patrons – i.e. Popes, Clerics, Holy Roman Emperors, Princes, Princesses, and other ruling figures – we will investigate how changes in style from the early Christian period through the fifteenth century reveal the fluid nature of politics and power during this volatile time period. We will visit local collections of manuscripts (e.g. the Walters Art Museum) and make use of the extensive holdings of medieval facsimiles in Special Collections.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/9
  • PosTag(s): HART-MED

Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present
AS.389.201 (01)

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/30
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH

Object Encounters at the Baltimore Museum of Art
AS.389.384 (01)

Using the Baltimore Museum of Art as a laboratory, students examine canonical narratives in art museums and iterate new approaches to objects in museums that build equity, interrogate privilege, decolonise, revisualise and offer alternative stories. Class meets at the museum every other week.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.010.105 (01)Art of the Ancient AmericasTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMDeleonardis, Lisa HART-ANC, ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.222 (01)Representing Roman Power: Sculpture as Political Rhetoric from Republic to EmpireMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMMiranda, Amy ChristineKrieger 306HART-ANC
AS.010.101 (01)Intro to History West ArtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 10:00AM - 10:50AMStaffGilman 50
AS.010.310 (01)The ‘Long Sixties’ in EuropeTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMWarnock, MollyGilman 134HART-MODERN
AS.010.101 (04)Intro to History West ArtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMStaffGilman 50
AS.010.203 (01)AbstractionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWarnock, MollyGilman 177HART-MODERN
AS.010.207 (01)Art, Architecture and Urban Life in Renaissance ItalyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMWiens, Gavin TylerGilman 177HART-RENBAR
AS.010.320 (01)Art of Colonial PeruTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMDeleonardis, LisaGilman 119HART-NW
AS.010.101 (02)Intro to History West ArtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 11:00AM - 11:50AMStaffGilman 50
AS.010.101 (03)Intro to History West ArtMW 12:00PM - 1:15PM, F 12:00PM - 12:50PMStaffGilman 50
AS.010.419 (01)Passion Image, Passion Cult, Passion Drama: Narrative and Metaphor in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and BeyondW 1:30PM - 3:50PMMerback, MitchellGilman 177HART-RENBAR
AS.010.325 (01)Arts of the Spanish EmpireMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHyman, Aaron M.Gilman 119HART-RENBAR
AS.040.218 (01)Celebration and Performance in Early GreeceM 1:30PM - 4:00PMAnderson, Emily S.K.Gilman 108ARCH-ARCH
AS.010.425 (01)Patronage and Power: The Art of the Book in the Middle AgesW 4:00PM - 6:30PMLakey, ChristopherGilman 177HART-MED
AS.389.201 (01)Introduction to the Museum: Past and PresentMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKingsley, Jennifer PGilman 119HIST-EUROPE, ARCH-ARCH
AS.389.384 (01)Object Encounters at the Baltimore Museum of ArtTh 1:30PM - 3:50PMKingsley, Jennifer PWolman MPR